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Daniel Lentz - On the Leopard Altar - Deadstock LP

12.00
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Daniel Lentz - On the Leopard Altar - Deadstock LP

12.00
Deadstock from its 1984 release on ICON Records.

"The form and flow of Is It Love? is determined by that of the text/lyric. Unlike much of my music-with-text work, it does not use an additive process. Rather, it uses a subtractive one. The voices begin each line with the nearly simultaneous sounding of all the phonemes of all of the words. As the work progresses, phonemes and notes are taken away until a finished line emerges.

"Lascaux is scored for wineglasses, sixteen of which are rubbed and nine of which are struck. Other than reverb, no effects have been added to the natural sounds of the glasses.

"On the Leopard Altar consists of six songs, each of which is heard alone and in combination with those that preceded it. Each text line makes its own kind of sense, which will change when combined with other lines from which phonemes are borrowed in order to make different words and new lines. For example, "May-an" is formed from the words "my" and "sun" (dropping the "s"). And, to add textual variety, tucked into this wordplay are homonyms, e.g., "reign" and "rain." Jessica Karraker is the featured singer.

"In Wolf Is Dead… each line of text is joined by a phonetic link to the line following it, creating a word chain (e.g., "you died" overlapping with "you did"). This concept is the basis for the musical structure as well, with each chord overlapping and fusing with the one that preceded it.

"Requiem attempts to capture the experience of hearing a lone singer in a large, empty cathedral. While this occurs, and from an entirely different space, one hears big, resonant "church bells" producing a rich array of overtones that seem to form melodies of their own. Jessica Karraker is the featured singer." — Daniel Lentz
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Deadstock from its 1984 release on ICON Records.

"The form and flow of Is It Love? is determined by that of the text/lyric. Unlike much of my music-with-text work, it does not use an additive process. Rather, it uses a subtractive one. The voices begin each line with the nearly simultaneous sounding of all the phonemes of all of the words. As the work progresses, phonemes and notes are taken away until a finished line emerges.

"Lascaux is scored for wineglasses, sixteen of which are rubbed and nine of which are struck. Other than reverb, no effects have been added to the natural sounds of the glasses.

"On the Leopard Altar consists of six songs, each of which is heard alone and in combination with those that preceded it. Each text line makes its own kind of sense, which will change when combined with other lines from which phonemes are borrowed in order to make different words and new lines. For example, "May-an" is formed from the words "my" and "sun" (dropping the "s"). And, to add textual variety, tucked into this wordplay are homonyms, e.g., "reign" and "rain." Jessica Karraker is the featured singer.

"In Wolf Is Dead… each line of text is joined by a phonetic link to the line following it, creating a word chain (e.g., "you died" overlapping with "you did"). This concept is the basis for the musical structure as well, with each chord overlapping and fusing with the one that preceded it.

"Requiem attempts to capture the experience of hearing a lone singer in a large, empty cathedral. While this occurs, and from an entirely different space, one hears big, resonant "church bells" producing a rich array of overtones that seem to form melodies of their own. Jessica Karraker is the featured singer." — Daniel Lentz